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Carolina Public Press continues its celebration of 10 years of investigative and public interest journalism in North Carolina. In the sixth event in our free virtual Ten for NC series, CPP convened a panel of experts to discuss the effects of severe weather and rising temperatures on North Carolina’s coastal communities and its commercial and recreational fishing industries.

The “Changing Tides” series examines the changes to the state’s coastal ecology from the perspectives of scientists, regulators and people whose livelihoods depend on the seas, examining divided opinions, best practices and potential public policy and regulatory shifts that could improve outlooks. The series was funded in part through the Pulitzer Center.

This companion event featured a robust discussion of the issues of erratic weather’s effects on coastal communities and livelihoods as well as solutions to the problems that arise from climate change and man-made environmental damage.

See the video from the event below:

Climate change contributes to rising seas, plus more frequent and severe storms, with a strong impact on fisheries in coastal North Carolina on which commercial and recreational fishing rely. The "Changing Tides" series examines the changes from the perspectives of scientists, regulators and people whose livelihoods depend on the seas, examining divided opinions, best practices and potential public policy and regulatory shifts that could improve outlooks. This companion event featured a panel of experts discussing the issues of erratic weather's effects on coastal communities and livelihoods as well as solutions to the problems that arise from climate change and man made environmental damage.

This exciting panel included:

Ryan Bethea

The North Carolina coast holds a bounty of fresh seafood. Ryan Bethea gave up teaching to become one of North Carolina's oyster farmers, using science to raise award-winning oysters on Harkers Island; five acres of estuary he leases from the state; because he wanted to make a difference in providing fresh and local seafood.

Leda Cunningham

Leda Cunningham leads the Pew Charitable Trust’s work in U.S. Atlantic waters to protect and restore ocean resources and coastal habitats, including seagrass and oysters, and to ensure sustainable fishing policies. She is based in Morehead City, North Carolina.

Jack Igelman

Jack Igelman is a reporter with a master’s degree from Montana State University, where he studied natural resource economics. His main interest is in conservation and environmental stories that on the people, places and institutions involved with managing the state’s natural resources.

Sara Mirabilio

Sara Mirabilio is a Fisheries Extension Specialist at North Carolina Sea Grant, whose work includes cooperative research with, and providing technical training to, North Carolina’s commercial, for-hire and recreational fishermen.

Malin Pinsky

Malin Pinsky is an Associate Professor at Rutgers University (New Jersey, USA) in the Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Natural Resources, a member of the Institute of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, and an affiliate in the Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences.

Queen Quet, Marquetta L. Goodwine,

Queen Quet, Chieftess and Head-of-State for the Gullah/Geechee Nation, is a published author, computer scientist, lecturer, preservationist and environmental justice advocate is the founder of the premiere advocacy organization for the continuation of Gullah/Geechee culture, the Gullah/Geechee Sea Island Coalition.

This panel included:

Ryan Bethea, an oyster farmer based on Harkers Island.

Leda Cunningham, based in Morehead City, leader of the Pew Charitable Trust’s work in North Carolina waters to protect and restore ocean resources and coastal habitats, including seagrass and oysters, and to ensure sustainable fishing policies.

Jack Igelman, based in Asheville, lead environmental reporter for Carolina Public Press, holds a master’s degree in natural resource economics from Montana State University.

Sara Mirabilio, a Fisheries Extension Specialist at North Carolina Sea Grant, whose work includes cooperative research with, and providing technical training to, North Carolina’s commercial, for-hire and recreational fishermen.

Malin Pinsky, Associate Professor at Rutgers University in the Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Natural Resources, a member of the Institute of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, and an affiliate in the Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences.

Queen Quet, Marquetta L. Goodwine, Chieftess and Head-of-State for the Gullah/Geechee Nation, a published author, computer scientist, lecturer, preservationist and environmental justice advocate, founder of the premiere advocacy organization for the continuation of Gullah/Geechee culture, the Gullah/Geechee Sea Island Coalition.

The Ten for NC series is designed to help readers go in-depth on issues and interests of North Carolinians.

(1) comment

David Collins

Simple answer to the lead in question is , it is not !

Despite all the gobblygook , these esteemed wannabe experts are just posting theories . Theories that agree with a certain narrative that leads to notoriety that leads to employment that leads to $$$$ .

Our coast has problems for sure but this is not one of them . Let’s not borrow trouble where none exists .

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