Updated, 8 a.m. Sunday - The County Emergency Operations Center reports Hurricane Matthew is exiting the county. After heavy rain and winds, the county is still receiving tropical storm force winds through much of Sunday.

The center has received reports of multiple trees and power lines downed, some flooding in low-lying areas, power outages and a some structural damage.

Fewer than 100 residents are in the shelters overnight. 

Motorists are urged to use caution, as hazardous road conditions continue. If traveling outside the county, check with N.C. Department of Transportation because of major flooding in neighboring counties.

Assessment teams are ready to go in the county and the county will be assisting teams from NCDOT and power crews to make sure roadways are clear and power restored.

There are no plans for debris removal in the unincorporated areas. Homeowners are urged not to place debris on roadsides. Those in town should follow the direction of officials there.

Seven confirmed deaths are reported in the state, Gov. Pat McCrory advised Sunday morning in a press conference in Raleigh. None are in Carteret County.

Many schools upstate will close Monday, and the state is preparing for more major flooding.

Carteret County schools were already scheduled to be closed on Monday.

Matthew is still a post-tropical cyclone about 60 miles off Cape Hatteras with maximum sustained winds of 75 mph moving east, northeast at 14 mph.

Updated, 11 p.m. - The National Hurricane Center 11 p.m. advisory reports Matthew is moving toward the east-northeast near 14 mph (22 km/h) and this motion is expected to continue tonight. An eastward motion is expected Sunday night and Monday. On the forecast track, the center of Matthew should move near or south of the coast of North Carolina tonight and east of the North Carolina coast on Sunday. Maximum sustained winds are near 75 mph (120 km/h) with higher gusts. Little change in strength is forecast tonight, although Matthew could become a post-tropical cyclone later tonight. Weakening is expected Sunday and Monday. Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 70 miles (110 km) mainly to the southwest of the center, and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 185 miles (295 km). 

Update, 8 p.m. - The National Hurricane Center 8 p.m. intermediate advisory reports the center of Hurricane Matthew is now east of Cape Fear. Record-breaking flooding is developing over Eastern North Carolina. A hurricane watch remains in effect to Cape Lookout, as well as tropical storm warning as far north as Duck and the Pamlico and Albemarle sounds.

Matthew is moving toward the east-northeast near 13 mph (20 km/h), and this motion is expected to continue tonight and early Sunday. On theforecast track, the center of Matthew will be near the coast ofsouthern North Carolina by this evening.

Maximum sustained winds remain near 75 mph (120 km/h) with higher gusts. While Matthew is expected to remain near hurricane strength while the center is near the North Carolina coast, the system could become a post-tropical cyclone later tonight or on Sunday.Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 25 miles (35 km) mainly over water southwest of the center. Tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 185 miles (295 km). During the past few hours, Myrtle Beach has reported a wind gust of 74 mph (119 km/h) and CORMP buoy 41024 has reported a wind gust of 67 mph (108 km/h). The minimum central pressure estimated from Air Force aircraft data is 981 mb (28.97 inches).

Update, 5 p.m. - The National Hurricane Center at 5 p.m. reports Hurricane Matthew remains a Category 1 hurricane. Hurricane watch remains in effect north of Surf City to Cape Lookout. Tropical storm warning is in effect north to Duck as well as the Pamlico and Albemarle sounds. Matthew is moving toward the east-northeast near 13 mph and this motion is expected to continue tonight and early Sunday. On this forecast track, the center of Matthew will be near the coast of southern North Carolina by this evening.

Maximum sustained winds remain near 75 mph (120 km/h) with higher gusts. Although weakening is forecast during the next 48 hours, Matthew is expected to remain near hurricane strength while the center is near the coasts of North Carolina.

Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 25 miles (35 km) mainly over water to the east of the center. Tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 185 miles (295 km). Multiple private weather stations along the coast of South Carolina near Myrtle Beach have recently reported hurricane-force wind gusts.

The minimum central pressure estimated from Air Force aircraft data is 977 mb (28.85 inches). CORMP buoy 41024 near the center also reported a minimum pressure of 977.8 mb (28.87 inches)

Update, 2 p.m. - The National Hurricane Center issued an intermediate advisory at 2 p.m. for Hurricane Matthew. Matthew is still a Category 1 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane wind scale. Its moving along the South Carolina coast, but is still forecast to head east and out to sea before it reaches North Carolina.

According to the advisory, Matthew is right over Myrtle Beach, S.C. and about 55 miles west-southwest of Cape Fear. It has maximum sustained winds of 75 mph and is moving northeast at 12 mph. Matthew's minimum central barometric pressure is 28.7 inches.

According to the NHC long range forecast, Matthew is expected to start moving east later today as it weakens to a tropical storm, going past the southern tip of North Carolina and out to sea into early Sunday. It's forecast to turn to the southeast sometime Sunday into early Monday.

Original article

MIAMI — Hurricane Matthew made landfall southeast of McClellanville, S.C., but the National Hurricane Center is forecasting it will turn away to the east, staying offshore of North Carolina.

The NHC issued a public advisory at 11 a.m. today. According to the advisory, Matthew is a Category 1 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane wind scale. It’s located about 55 miles south-southwest of Myrtle Beach, S.C. and about 100 miles southwest of Cape Fear. Matthew has maximum sustained winds of about 75 mph and is moving northeast at 12 mph. Its minimum central barometric pressure is 28.56 inches.

As of 11 a.m., a hurricane warning is in effect in North Carolina from the N.C./S.C. state line to Surf City. A hurricane watch is in effect north of Surf City to Cape Lookout. A tropical storm warning is also in effect north of Surf City to Duck and in Pamlico and Albemarle Sounds.

According to the National Weather Service website weather.gov, as of 11 a.m. today there is a hurricane watch and a tropical storm warning in effect for Carteret County. There is also a tornado watch in effect until 4 p.m. today, a flash flood warning in effect until 5:15 p.m. today, a flash flood watch in effect until 2 p.m. Sunday and a high threat of rip currents, dangerous shore break and surf height of 10-15 feet south of Cape Hatteras until 8 p.m. Sunday. 

Hurricane force winds extend outward up to 25 miles from the center of Matthew and tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 185 miles. Sustained winds of 53 mph, with a gust to 69 mph, have been observed in South Carolina. In Laurinberg, a wind gust of 55 mph was reported.

Hazards being reported include 5-7 feet of storm surge from the N.C./S.C. state border to Cape Fear, and 2-4 feet from Cape Fear to Duck, including Pamlico and Albemarle Sound. The NHC said there’s a danger of life-threatening inundation in various areas along the North Carolina coast in the next 36-48 hours.

Matthew is forecast to produce 8-12 inches of rainfall in eastern North Carolina, with isolated maximum amounts of 15 inches. Tornadoes are also possible through early tonight along the state coast.

According to the NHC’s long range forecast, Matthew is expected to weaken to a tropical storm sometime today, just south of the southern tip of North Carolina. It’s expected to move further out to sea and away from the coast, then begin turning to the southeast late Sunday into early Monday.

NHC advisories are available online at its website nhc.noaa.gov.

(0) comments

Welcome to the discussion.

As a privately owned web site, we reserve the right to edit or remove comments that contain spam, advertising, vulgarity, threats of violence, racism, anti-Semitism, or personal/abusive/condescending attacks on other users or goading them. The same applies to trolling, the use of multiple aliases, or just generally being a jerk. Enforcement of this policy is at the sole discretion of the site administrators and repeat offenders may be blocked or permanently banned without warning.