Editor's note: This article was updated at 1:57 p.m. Thursday, March 26, 2020, with an update on the type of plane involved. 

EMERALD ISLE — According to a Tuesday tweet by the National Transportation Safety Board Newsroom media relations account, the plane that went down in the Atlantic Ocean 13 miles south of Bogue Inlet early this week was a Maule MT-7235, not a Cessna, as has been reported by multiple outlets, including the News-Times.

“NTSB investigating the March 24 crash of a Maule MT-7235 airplane in the Atlantic Ocean near Cherry Point, North Carolina,” the NTSB Newsroom said on Twitter.

The U.S. Coast Guard had reported the plane as a Cessna in a news release Monday night.

After being contacted by the News-Times, Petty Officer Shannon Kearney, public affairs officer in the Coast Guard’s 5th District office in Portsmouth, Va., said Thursday she “checked with command and the plane was in fact a Maule.”

According to the website of FlightAware, a Houston-based company that live-tracks airplane flights, the plane took off from Mt. Pleasant Regional Airport in South Carolina at 7:51 p.m. Monday and was scheduled to arrive at Michael J. Smith Field in Beaufort at 8:34 p.m.

According to the website, the plane had previously left Orangeburg Municipal Airport in South Carolina at 6:35 p.m. Monday and landed at Mt. Pleasant Regional Airport at 7:04 p.m. before taking off again.

The News-Times was directed to the NTSB Newsroom tweet and the FlightAware website Wednesday by Ken Lohr, a local commercial pilot and former chairman of the Carteret County-Beaufort Airport Authority.

The U.S. Coast Guard has not released any information beyond the correction on the type of plane since Tuesday night, when a news release said the agency had suspended its search for two missing people from the crash, pending the development of new information that would warrant further search.

Petty Officer Kearney said Thursday morning the search is still suspended, and the names of the presumed victims have not been released.

 

Contact Brad Rich at 252-864-1532; email Brad@thenewstimes.com; or follow on Twitter @brichccnt.

 

 

 

(Previous report)

EMERALD ISLE — A public affairs officer at the U.S. Coast Guard 5th District office in Portsmouth, Va., said Wednesday morning that searchers identified a debris field they believe is from a Cessna aircraft that crashed in the ocean with two people aboard Monday night.

Petty Officer Shannon Kearney said the debris field and crash site are 13 miles south of Bogue Inlet, off Emerald Isle.

She said the Coast Guard’s search and rescue effort, suspended late Tuesday, will resume if any new information warrants it.

Petty Officer Kearney said the airplane took off from Orangeburg, S.C., bound for Beaufort. She did not know when the plane left South Carolina or when it was expected to land in Beaufort.

The people onboard the plane have not been identified.

Coast Guard Sector North Carolina watchstanders were initially notified by Air Traffic Control Cherry Point that an aircraft reportedly dropped from its radar Monday at about 11 p.m.

The Coast Guard said crews yesterday searched a combined 676.3 square miles over air, sea and land.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board will be investigating 

 

 

(Previous report)

EMERALD ISLE — The U.S. Coast Guard announced about 9:15 p.m. Tuesday it had suspended its search for two missing people involved in a reported Cessna airplane crash in the ocean about 12 miles from Bogue Inlet.

Coast Guard Sector North Carolina watchstanders were initially notified by Air Traffic Control Cherry Point that an aircraft reportedly dropped from their radar Monday at about 11 p.m.

The Coast Guard said crews searched a combined 676.3 square miles over air, sea and land.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board will be investigating the cause of the incident, and the search has been suspended pending the development of new information. 

 

(Previous report)

EMERALD ISLE — Crews from the U.S. Coast Guard are searching for survivors of a Monday evening plane crash near Emerald Isle.

According to the Tuesday morning release, a Cessna airplane reportedly crashed southeast of Bogue Inlet, near Emerald Isle around 11 p.m. Two people were reportedly on board.

The release from the Coast Guard states watchstanders at Coast Guard Sector North Carolina command center received a call from air traffic control at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point after the Cessna dropped off radar 12 miles southeast of Bogue Inlet at approximately 11 p.m. Monday.

The Coast Guard launched an MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter from Marine Corps Air Station Elizabeth City, a C-130 Hercules aircraft from Air Station Elizabeth City, a 45-foot Response Boat — Medium from Coast Guard Station Emerald Isle and Coast Guard Fast Response Cutter Nathan Bruckenthal.

Around 2 p.m. Tuesday, officials said they were “still searching.”

Emerald Isle Town Manager Matt Zapp said the Coast Guard was in charge of all search and rescue efforts related to the crash.

“None of our team are involved,” he said. “It was well off the coast, 12 miles, so it’s a Coast Guard issue.”

Anyone with additional information regarding the case can contact the Sector North Carolina command center on VHF-FM channel 16 or at 910-343-3880.

 

Contact Brad Rich at 252-864-1532; email Brad@thenewstimes.com; or follow on Twitter @brichccnt.
 
 
(Previous report)
EMERALD ISLE — The U.S. Coast Guard is searching for possible survivors after an airplane crashed near Emerald Isle on Monday night.

Coast Guard officials report that the Cessna airplane had two people aboard. Air Traffic Control Cherry Point alerted watchstanders at the Coast Guard Sector North Carolina that the plane dropped its radar 12 miles southeast of Bogue Inlet around 11 p.m. on Monday.

The Coast Guard has deployed a helicopter from Elizabeth City, a C-130 Hercules airplane from Elizabeth City, a 45-foot response boat from Emerald Isle, and Coast Guard Fast Response Cutter Nathan Bruckenthal to search for the missing plane and its passengers.

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