Morehead City, N.C.

May 9, 2013

TO THE EDITOR:

Regarding your May 5 editorial, I don’t write in support of or in opposition to the recreational fishing bill. I address your comments about farm-raised fish. You said: “Those who have eaten farm-raised fish and wild caught fish know there is a distinct difference. Farm-raised fish are bred in pens, overseas and in the United States, with their waste. And they are not good.”

I teach the aquaculture technology program at Carteret Community College. Your comments are contrary to the principles I teach. I point out some facts based on my professional expertise in aquaculture and farming of fish.

Farm-raised fish are bred and reared in raceways or ponds or pens or recirculation systems with good water quality. Good water quality is essential to proper growth and survival of farmed fish. Good water quality is maintained using best management practices, reducing the use of chemicals in aquaculture.

Best management practices include stocking disease free seeds and fingerlings, providing aeration and dissolved oxygen, feeding nutritionally complete feeds and minimizing stress on the fish. Chemicals are highly restricted in the fish farming industry and there are only six drugs approved by the FDA for use in food fish aquaculture. Farm-raised fish sent to markets are chemical free and some can qualify for organic food status.

Farm-raised fish are fed a high quality feed with corn and soybean and fishmeal protein along with vitamins and minerals for a balanced and complete diet. Farmed fish convert this feed to muscle protein at the rate of 1.5 to 2 pounds of fish feed per pound of weight gain. Wild fish feed on a diet of other fish and marine organisms. Wild fish convert that diet to muscle protein at the rate of 10-12 pounds of food per pound of weight gain.

The fish waste in ponds and recirculation aquaculture systems is converted to non-toxic compounds through the natural process of nitrification by benign bacterial action. The water is reused to conserve our ground water resources. Wild fish grow in waters that contain chemicals from rainwater runoff, sewage treatment plants, yards and fields and the waste of other marine organisms. Rainwater runoff often contains the waste and fecal coliform bacteria of humans or other warm-blooded animals. Almost every other kind of food we eat is farm-raised.

All vegetables and meats sold in stores and in restaurants are grown on farms; even “wild rice”  is farmed. It’s against the law to sell most wild-harvested animals except for some fish and seafood. U.S. seafood consumption is 15 pounds per capita per year. That demand exceeds the capacity of the domestic fishery necessitating the importation of seafood. In 2012 the U.S. national trade deficit for fish and seafood was $10.96 billion, which is 1.5% of the entire U.S. trade deficit.

Over 80% of seafood consumed in the U.S. and Carteret County is imported. Of all imported seafood, approximately 50% is farm-raised. Most of the fish and seafood consumed in the U.S. is farm-raised.

Following is a list of farm-raised fish and seafood: tilapia (100% farm-raised), catfish (100% farm-raised), salmon (60% farm-raised), shrimp (90% farm-raised), clams, scallops, oysters, mussels, abalone, red drum, hybrid striped bass, rainbow trout, crawfish, yellow perch, largemouth bass and bluegill bream, flounder, black sea bass, queen conch, eel, cobia, carp, barramundi, soft-shell blue crabs, sturgeon and caviar, sushi nori and other sea vegetables.

The above facts speak for themselves to address your comment about farm-raised fish that “they are not good,” and I would challenge you to conduct a blind taste test among consumers to answer your statement that “there is a distinct difference.”

Sources: Seafood Health Facts, NOAA Fishwatch, USDA Economic Research Service, About Seafood, U.S. Census Bureau, N.J. Department of Agriculture, USDA-National Institute Food/Agriculture, NOAA Office of Science and Technology.

SKIP KEMP

(29) comments

clammerhead

And this is supposed to be a reason to go with farm raised seafood? I'm not sure this is a positive thing? More of a second best, if that acceptable.....

Clammerhead

Harkers Island Tailfisher

Thanks for bringing some light, backed by good data and facts, to this issue. The college is lucky to have you and this program.

Take care

moreheadmom

Clammerhead you are not really helping your cause with comments like that.

When someone such as Skip brings hard facts to the sticking your fingers in your ears and saying "la la la la la la" makes you seem petty and uninformed.

David Collins

Wild Caught seafood is raised with every ones and every things waste. Always been that way. All the worlds poop eventually ends up in the ocean. On this Earth,where else can it go?

clammerhead

moreheadmom,

Think a little further into what I said, and you might see that I am right.....

Clammerhead

HenryB

What we’re talking here is fresh vs. frozen. Taste wise, it doesn’t matter if the meat is farmed or wild, but unfrozen farmed fish is essentially not available. If you are going to prepare fish frozen for market you better know what you are doing. Slowly frozen products will be mushy when thawed, as opposed to a flash frozen product. A shrimp caught in the Far East got to be frozen before it goes to market. I’ve tried enough Far East shrimp to say they are all mushy; there is no comparing them to local, fresh, unfrozen ones. The same goes for trout, drum, etc., etc.

Osprey

Farm raised certainly has its place in the market. Farm raised product helps meet demand. Just about all of us eat farm raised meat & vegetables. When was the last time you were able to go out and hunt a cow to get fresh meat? Or take a walk to find a fresh tomato or strawberry? I prefer fresh fish, shrimp & crab. But when it is not in season or available next best thing might be frozen or farm raised. And NO I do not eat imported shrimp.

Harkers Island Tailfisher

HenryB, how can a fish caught and landed at Ocracoke, be any fresher than one farm raised over around Aurora???

Take care

clammerhead

If you want to see an example of bad results from imported products, look at one of the posters on this thread...

Saying you are an Harkers Islander does not make you a local product.

It's like gasoline in the water jug...All it takes is one drop to ruin it for everyone...

Clammerhead

SEABASS

In 10 years the % may be more like 70 to 80%. More and more people are looking to farm raised be cause it will pay year around not just 6 months a year. And it is cleaner.

MyronASmith

1.OMEGA-3 FATTY ACIDS ARE IN US WILD NATURAL FISH AND SEAFOOD.
OMEGA-3 FATTY ACIDS ARE NOT FOUND IN FARM RAISED FISH AND
SEAFOOD.
Nutritional value of farm raised seafood is inferior to fish and US WILD seafood. that is US Wild, the fish and sea life has OMEGA-3 FATTY ACIDS. The live and swim in natural sounds, creeks, and ocean.
Skip Kemp, when farm raised seafood was looked at by the NC Fisheries Association when farm raised fish and seafood began 20 years ago.
Omega-3 Fatty Acid are essential fatty acids for our bodies to work normal and our diets by eating natural fish is the main source. Omega -3 fatty acid supplements (EPA/DHA) may cause blood to to thin and cause excess bleeding, particularly in people taking anticoagulant drugs. Health wise folks prefer natural US wild seafood.
Farm raised fish and seafood is not as healthy as the US Wild seafood and fish. With the lack of US Wild Fish and Seafood people can buy farm raised that is their choice.
2. But it is not the choice of the majority of consumers if they have a choice the natural US Wild fish and seafood are selected and purchased by more folks. It is a healthier food and taste better.
3. The cost of farm raised seafood was too costly unless government grants paid monies to support this procedure. It has been tried before. No profit in farm raised fish and seafood.
If the market and profit supports farm raised fish and seafood, you have the right to farm raise seafood. Farm raised is not as healthy!

moreheadmom

as I stated before, Clammerhead does way more harm then good for your cause.

When you have ignorant remarks like his its incredibly tough to be sympathetic to you guys from down east. You have tunnel vision and you are obviously way too invested in this to have a rational thought process.

Drime

Folks that are not local don't know the true taste of local seafood . There is a big difference in the taste of local verses farm raised . Its a shame only the locals really know what GOOD SEAFOOD should taste like. But who knows maybe, we are the ones that don't know the true meaning of good seafood. NOT .And then again why are people flocking to the coast telling us how to live and fish!!!!???? People that live west of New Bern should deal with their back yards and leave the ones east of them alone .

Core Sounder

Think Mr kemp is wriong if he thinks that a people that live along the coast of NC are not able to tell the difference between fresh wild caught and the taste of something that was raised in some fish pond overseas. Interesting that he did not comment on the omega-3 (good) versus the omega -6 (not so good) ratio found in fish.

clammerhead

moreheadmom...

What is so " Ignorant " about my statement?...I even discussed this with some Marine Scientist today, and they agreed with me.....

Maybe before y call someone ignorant, you should verse yourself on the subject... ( both ignorance, and farm raised fish v. wild fish )

Clammerhead

clammerhead

moreheadmom,

You also might want to learn a bit more about me before you judge me.....

Clammerhead

John

Omega-3 is great for the body but you can buy enough on it from wal-mart for about $20 to last you 3 months. And that isomega-3 krill oil the best omega around way better than from fish. Just look it up the proof is there. Next thing you forgot to say is MERCURY!!! Did you know that mercury is 30 to 40% higher in wild fish and shellfish than in farm raised. However, nearly all fish and shellfish contain traces of mercury. For most people, the risk from mercury by eating fish and shellfish is not a health concern. Yet, some fish and shellfish contain higher levels of mercury that may harm an unborn baby or young child's developing nervous system and in olderpeople. The risks from mercury in fish and shellfish depend on the amount of fish and shellfish eaten and the levels of mercury in the fish and shellfish. Therefore, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) are advising women who may become pregnant, pregnant women, nursing mothers, and young children And older people to avoid some types of fish and eat fish and shellfish that are lower in mercury. And DIME the people west of US 17 knows we could care less about them. And thats why they could care less about US. And what happens to us. Dont go crying to raleigh when they pass bils and change thing on you they know where you stand.

MyronASmith

To: JOHN, The best source of Omega - 3 fatty acid are fish from US waters. Health experts have already recommended fresh fish and seafood that are wild.
The advise of mercury came from imported seafood and fish were put on the market. Farm raised fish and seafood are in contained water where these harmful chemicals are used. UNLESS THE WATERS ARE POLLUTED IN COASTAL WATERS THE OMEGA - FATTY ACID IS GREAT. Health adviser and Nutritious recommended WILD FISH and SEAFOOD. Mercury comes from chemicals used on foreign imported seafood. FDA have regulations for US Wild Seafood. Local coastal waters are checked for Water Contaminations when any reports come in and at times certain coastal water areas are closed until naturally creeks and coastal waters clean out naturally in 1week -2 months usually. After severe hurricanes this may happen. Virginia and Alaska waters fish from those areas provide omega-3 fatty acids for the pills being sold. Fresh local Wild US Seafood is better source. Source of mercury came from dental fillings years ago. [smile][whistling]

MyronASmith

Mercury not a factor or difference between US Wild SEAFOOD VERSUS FARM RAISED. Mercury in seafood the FDA indicate mercury comes from the air through industrial pollution if 1.FARM RAISED FISH,SEAFOOD and 2. US Wild FISH, SEAFOOD are in water and local coastal waters both have some mercury. FDA advise all folks to eat fish and shellfish. But women who might become pregnant, are pregnant and young children are advised to eat fish and seafood twice weekly because of the mercury.
Not eat these fish and seafood with high levels of mercury: SHARK, SWORDFISH, KING MACKEREL, AND TILEFISH. But most folks do not eat these fish.
FDA ADVISE eat 12 ounces weekly only for pregnant women and young children (2 serving weekly).
Check on FDA web site for local seafood or call FDA to check specific use species of seafood. No difference in mercury level of US Wild and Farm raised. Depends upon Air pollution that mixes with the water.

John

MyronASmith Fish oil is probably the most infamous source for omega-3 fatty acids. Omega-3s are essential fatty acids (ALA, DHS, and EPA), and we need them in order for our body to function normally. These fatty acids are not made by the body, therefore we need to get them from food. Although salmon is one of the best sources for omega-3s, there are plenty of other options. Bluefish, mackerel, herring, tuna, anchovies and sardines are also excellent sources of omega-3s. It is generally recommended that fish be consumed two to three times per week. ALA is another vital omega-3 fatty acid. ALA is converted into omega-3s in the body. Several different types of oils are considered great sources for ALA omega-3 fatty acids. These include olive oil, flaxseed oil, canola oil and soybean oil. Both flaxseed and flaxseed oil are fantastic sources of omega-3 fatty acids. Flaxseed can typically be found in the health food section of your local grocery store, If you're not a fan of fish, eggs can be a great source of omega-3 fatty acids. These enriched eggs can be found at most grocery chains. Swap them for regular eggs and gain about seven times more omega-3s than regular eggs.
Omega-3 fatty acids are essential to overall health. There are many options beyond fish that can easily be incorporated into any diet, making this nutrient both kid-friendly and versatile! Head to your local grocery store and make a healthy change for you and your family today. And i will add that not one of the three fish in this bill is in the good omega-3"s class..But just to finsh this off look up this.That’s right. There’s a new kid on the block when it comes to Omega 3s and he’s superior in every way. It doesn’t matter how much EPA or DHA your fish oil supplement currently has because fish oil isn’t as readily absorbed and utilized by your body. Krill oil, on the other hand, is the most potent and bioavailable source of Omega 3s on the planet. Just look it up you will see it is true!! And just to let you know the top 10 fish highest in omega-3"s is Mackerel, 2.6g Rainbow Trout, 2.0g Herring,1.7g Tuna, bluefin, 1.6g Salmon, 1.5g Sardines canned, 1.5g Sturgeon, Atlantic, 1.5g
Tuna, albacore, 1.5g Whitefish, lake, 1.5g Anchovies,1.4g that's the top ten. No reds, stripers, or specks!!!

Core Sounder

offered without comment;;;
"In the United States, tilapia has shown the biggest gains in popularity among seafood, and this trend is expected to continue as consumption is projected to increase from 1.5 million tons in 2003 to 2.5 million tons by 2010," write the Wake Forest researchers in an article published this month in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association.

They say their research revealed that farm-raised tilapia, as well as farmed catfish, "have several fatty acid characteristics that would generally be considered by the scientific community as detrimental." Tilapia has higher levels of potentially detrimental long-chain omega-6 fatty acids than 80-percent-lean hamburger, doughnuts and even pork bacon, the article says.

"For individuals who are eating fish as a method to control inflammatory diseases such as heart disease, it is clear from these numbers that tilapia is not a good choice," the article says. "All other nutritional content aside, the inflammatory potential of hamburger and pork bacon is lower than the average serving of farmed tilapia."

The article notes that the health benefits of omega-3 fatty acids, known scientifically as "long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids" (PUFAs), have been well documented. The American Heart Association now recommends that everyone eat at least two servings of fish per week, and that heart patients consume at least 1 gram a day of the two most critical omega-3 fatty acids, known as EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid).

John

Sometime this year, we will quietly pass a milestone in human history: the majority of the fish we eat will be farm-raised rather than wild-caught.
In the last 20 years, the production of fish through aquaculture has grown exponentially, while marine fish catches have leveled off. Unless it’s an extraordinary year for marine fishing, in 2013 the lines will cross, and the majority of the fish we eat will come from aquaculture rather than oceans.
Fishing is the only part of global food production in which the tillers and the breeders of the world are not dominant, and this year, the last stronghold of the hunter-gatherers will be eclipsed, according to data from the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization’s 2012 State of World Fisheries and Aquaculture report.The reason, as several recent studies show, is that fishing is a “sticky” occupation. One study found that as years of fishing experience increases, so does job satisfaction and the unwillingness to leave the occupation. In another study, people in the Pacific Island nation of Kiribati were provided with a government subsidy for coconut production as a tool to reduce fishing pressure, and the result was the exact opposite. The extra income from coconuts gave them more time to do what they wanted, which was fishing.
Fishing remains one of the few occupations that people will pay money to do in their leisure time.
It is aquaculture that holds more promise for addressing the Malthusian dilemma of feeding a human population expected to increase by 50% over the next 50 years.One reason is that aquaculture is the most efficient producer of animal protein. Feed conversion ratios for several aquaculture fish species are approaching 1:1, meaning that for every pound of feed, a fish gains one pound. By comparison, the most efficient farmed animals on land are broiler chickens with a 1.6:1 feed conversion ratio. (One reason is that with a few exceptions like bluefin tuna, fish are coldblooded and thus use less energy than poultry, beef cows and hogs.)We’ve had 12,000 years of learning in agriculture and 60 years in large-scale aquaculture. There is still much that is unknown about domesticating fish and shellfish. But what’s clear is that the shift from foraging to farming is almost complete.
In another century, never-say-quit fishermen and dumpster-diving Freegans may be the only hunter-gatherers left.

.

[cool]

MyronASmith

Core Sounder Thanks for more specifics of omega fatty acids. I knew from research in the past FARM RAISED FISH AND SEAFOOD DO NOT HAVE THE HIGHEST LEVELS OF OMEGA FATTY ACIDS.
US WILD FISH AND SEAFOOD ARE MUCH BETTER FOR OMEGA -3- FATTY ACIDS.
[smile]

John

Mrs MyronASmith Core Sounder is right but there is one small problem. Tilapia (pron.: /tɨˈlɑːpiə/ ti-LA-pee-ə) is the common name for nearly a hundred species of cichlid fish from the tilapiine cichlid tribe. Tilapia are mainly freshwater fish, inhabiting shallow streams, ponds, rivers and lakes, and less commonly found living in brackish water. Historically, they have been of major importance in artisan fishing in Africa and the Levant, and are of increasing importance in aquaculture. Tilapia can become problematic invasive species in new warm-water habitats, whether deliberately or accidentally introduced, but generally not in temperate climates due to their inability to survive in cooler waters below about 21 °C (70 °F). And you are right SOME wild fish do have higher omega-3 But not the three fish you are crying about!

MyronASmith

To John Pro Fish Farms: Omega 3 fatty acids: Flaxseed oil is a source, but who is going to drink 1 cup, 8oz, of flax seed oil which provides 12059 mg pf Omega 3? One egg which was goose egg, no hen eggs LISTED as good source omega 3, has only 599 mg. US wild
Your choice is to drink a cup of flax seed oil or eat fillet of stripped bass, sea trout, or red drum?
1.US Wild Stripped bass 1 fillet about 3oz has 1591 mg of omega 3
2. US Wild Sea trout 1 fillet about 3 oz has 1365 mg of omega 3
3. US Wild Drum 1 fillet about 3 oz has 1531 mg of omega 3
All 3 fish in HB 983 are excellent sources of with high amounts of omega 3 fatty acids. (Source NUTRITION DATA.SELF.COM FACTS FINFISH)

Source(NUTRITIONAL DIFFERENCE BETWEEN WILD-CAUGHT AND FARM-RAISED FISH AUGUST 27, 2011) FISH FARMING has direct health threats the practice poses to the human populations. Damage caused by the pesticides and extensive antibiotics used in the fish farms. More lice have increased on farm raised fish farms then the lice have infected US Wild young fish and sea life. PCB content was 16 times higher in farm raised fish as wild fish that were sold in American grocery stores. Source THE WORLD HEALTHIEST FOODS discusses the differences 1. Farm-raised provide less usable omega -3 fats
US wild fish and seafood provide more usable omega - 3 fats
2. ??Sea lice, Disease and parasites, which would normally exist in relatively low levels in fish scattered around the oceans, run rampant in densely packed oceanic feedlots. Alexander Morton biologist in LA Times began to report 700 US Wild fish around fish farms 78 percent were covered with a fatal load of sea lice. While fish he netted farther from the farms were largely lice-free. British Columbia and Great Britain both showed the farmed fish accumulate more cancer-causing PCBs and toxic dioxins. Farm raised fish contained 16 times more PCBs levels than wild fish, 4 times the levels in beef, and 3.4 times the levels found in other seafood. Environmental Science and Technology August 2004 additives used is FLAME-RETARDANT, polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) in Fish Farms. PBDE has reproductive toxicity and play a role in cancer formation. Researchers both in Europe and the US think the environment of the Fish Farms and PBDEs are reaching the open ocean and into the marine food through atmospheric deposition.
FISH FEED FOR FARM RAISED FISH HAD CANTHAXANTHIN ADDED TO FEED, THERE IS A LINK BETWEEN CANTHAXANTHIN INTAKE AND RETINAL PROBLEMS, EYE PROBLEMS.
NO DO NOT EAT FARM RAISED FISH OR SEAFOOD.
Farm Raised Farms is a threat to WILD FISH AND SEAFOOD, natural with no harmful chemicals.
Then Pesticides fed to fish in farms and toxic copper sulfate used to keep nets free of algae are building up in sea-floor sediments. Antibiotic use has resulted in development of resistant strains that are infecting not only farm-raised but wild fish. The wild fish swim to the ocean.
This may be one reason why there is less fish for the Coastal Conservation Alliance. Aqua farms called "floating pig farms," by Daniel Pauly professor of fisheries at the University of British Columbia states floating pig farms put major strain upon their surrounding environment.

Harkers Island Tailfisher

For those that fly Delta (from a friend flying today),

http://deltaskymag.delta.com/Sky-Extras/Favorites/Fish-Out-of-Water.aspx

Take care

John

MyronASmith Again i did not say they didnt have any omega-3 in them i said they where at the bottem of the list of fish. Now if you cant understand this i dont know what else to do. SEAFOOD PRODUCT OMEGA-3s PER 3 OUNCE COOKED PORTION
Herring, Wild (Atlantic & Pacific) ♥♥♥♥♥ >1,500 milligrams
Salmon, Farmed (Atlantic) ♥♥♥♥♥
Salmon, Wild (King) ♥♥♥♥♥
Mackerel, Wild (Pacific & Jack) ♥♥♥♥♥

SEAFOOD PRODUCT OMEGA-3s PER 3 OUNCE COOKED PORTION
Salmon, Canned (Pink, Sockeye & Chum) ♥♥♥♥ 1,000 to 1,500 milligrams
Mackerel, Canned (Jack) ♥♥♥♥
Mackerel, Wild (Atlantic & Spanish) ♥♥♥♥
Tuna, Wild (Bluefin) ♥♥♥♥

SEAFOOD PRODUCT OMEGA-3s PER 3 OUNCE COOKED PORTION
Salmon, Wild (Sockeye, Coho, Chum & Pink) ♥♥♥ 500 to 1,000 milligrams
Sardines, Canned ♥♥♥
Tuna, Canned (White Albacore) ♥♥♥
Swordfish, Wild ♥♥♥
Trout, Farmed (Rainbow) ♥♥♥
Oysters, Wild & Farmed ♥♥♥
Mussels, Wild & Farmed ♥♥♥

SEAFOOD PRODUCT OMEGA-3s PER 3 OUNCE COOKED PORTION
Tuna, Canned (Light) ♥♥ 200 to 500 milligrams
Tuna, Wild (Skipjack) ♥♥
Pollock, Wild (Alaskan) ♥♥
Rockfish, Wild (Pacific) ♥♥
Clams, Wild & Farmed ♥♥
Crab, Wild (King, Dungeness & Snow) ♥♥
Lobster, Wild (Spiny) ♥♥
Snapper, Wild ♥♥
Grouper, Wild ♥♥
Flounder/Sole, Wild ♥♥
Halibut, Wild (Pacific & Atlantic) ♥♥
Ocean Perch, Wild ♥♥
Squid, Wild (Fried) ♥♥
Fish Sticks (Breaded) ♥♥

SEAFOOD PRODUCT OMEGA-3s PER 3 OUNCE COOKED PORTION
Scallops, Wild ♥ < 200 milligrams
Shrimp, Wild & Farmed ♥
Lobster, Wild (Northern) ♥
Crab, Wild (Blue) ♥
Cod, Wild ♥
Haddock, Wild ♥
Tilapia, Farmed ♥
Catfish, Farmed ♥
Mahimahi, Wild ♥
Tuna, Wild (Yellowfin) ♥
Orange Roughy, Wild ♥
Surimi Product (Imitation Crab) ♥


Source: USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference


Look it up its all there. if you dont understand this then just google .Fish oil - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Then look at the list. Then you can look up grams to milligrams there you will find that 1591 mg is only 1.59 grams. Not much at all when you break it down to what it realy is. Happy fishing.

clammerhead

moreheadmom,

I'm waiting to hear what is so ignorant about my post.

Clammerhead

gridlock

All I ask is that I be allowed to wade and catch a minimal part of a very valuable resource. No boat, no CCA, but dang guys... we are now at levels of omega3. No chance of me feeding on the farm stuff, but let's be real... it is our STATE fish. Just provide the same efforts as wildlife.... dove,duck, deer, bear, et al.

A resource from OUR state should be respected, not shipped out of state. Sorry if that doesn't fit in the comm biz plan, but if you claim to be for NC folks then you better deliver. Keep the resource in NC or bail on your current argument, pretty simple.

When profit is involved... we all know what happens.

Just consider there are more who don't want to take the resource, only occasionally have a dinner. And this has nothing to do with elite, racist, or any group wanting exclusive access. As I see it, if you want to break down the numbers on a per person basis, then the commercial side needs to step up and show how they are doing so.

Equal access, equal harvest, equal concern. This is not a comm vs rec number debate in my opinion. It is the per person utilization of a natural resource, plain and simple. According to the DMF numbers that's less than 300 for the commercial segment?

Can we please view this as a discussion similar to every other land based NC natural resource... duck,deer,bear,et al. Used to be that ducks could be mowed down on the water for the "industry". Those that participated seem to have changed careers much like many of us who have unfortunately had to do in this economy.

But most adjust and adapt...

Sorry, that is where you lost me... every comment on the bill review was that since the methods would not change, this bill would only result in the commercial side discarding everything since it would be a nuisance. Pretty work guys... and good luck you can convince the voting public that you are truly concerned about our state resource.

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