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Man bitten by gator (updated)

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Posted: Wednesday, May 16, 2012 2:30 pm

STACY  — Authorities say a man who stopped to remove an alligator Tuesday night along Highway 70 near the Dan Taylor Bridge was bitten on the arm.

State wildlife officials estimate the alligator was 10 feet long and weighed about 300 pounds.

Aquarium officials released the victim’s name to the News-Times Thursday morning, which is permitted under the state personnel act. The bite victim is Fred Boyce, an aquarist working as a herpetologist with the N.C. Aquarium at Pine Knoll Shores. Mr. Boyce started working at the aquarium on March 5, 2012. They said his actions were after hours and a voluntary act on his own part. Mr. Boyce was not at work on Thursday.

“The important thing is, I think he is going to be alright,” said Julie Powers, public relations director.

N.C. Division of Wildlife officers got a call about 5:45 p.m. Tuesday that an alligator was in a ditch beside the highway near this Down East community, according to Master Wildlife Officer Ryan Taylor.

“We figured he was looking for water and just needed to be left alone,” the officer said.

In a few minutes the division received a second call saying emergency responders had been dispatched to an alligator bite.

Officer Taylor said district biologist Dr. Robbie Norvell was contacted Tuesday about the gator.

The plan was to leave the gator alone hoping he would return to the wild.

“We were going to leave the gator alone overnight,” Officer Taylor said. “If he was still there today, then we would formulate a plan to relocate him.”

But once the gator was disturbed and Mr. Boyce was bitten, the plan of action changed.

Dr. Norvell proceeded to capture the gator and released it back into the wild.

“The prudent thing to do with a gator before just jumping on it is to try and tire it out first,” said Officer Taylor. “This is what was done yesterday by the game biologist and he had no more problems with the gator.”

The gator was moved to a safe place, but the location was not revealed.

“That is for the safety of people and gator both,” the officer added.

 

(previous story)

STACY — Authorities say a man who stopped to remove an alligator Tuesday night along Highway 70 near the Dan Taylor Bridge was bitten on the arm.

State wildlife officials estimate the alligator was 10 feet long and weighed about 300 pounds.

The bite victim was an employee with the N.C. Aquarium at Pine Knoll Shores, staff confirmed today, but did not release his name. They said his actions were after hours and a voluntary act on his own part.

“The important thing is, I think he is going to be alright,” said Julie Powers, public relations director.

The staff wants to find out more information before an official statement is released.

N.C. Division of Wildlife officers got a call about 5:45 p.m. Tuesday that an alligator was in a ditch beside the highway near this Down East community, according to Master Wildlife Officer Ryan Taylor.

“We figured he was looking for water and just needed to be left alone,” the officer said.

In a few minutes the division received a second call saying emergency responders had been dispatched to an alligator bite.

Officer Taylor said district biologist Dr. Robbie Norvell was contacted Tuesday about the gator.

The plan was to leave the gator alone hoping he would return to the wild.

“We were going to leave the gator alone overnight,” Officer Taylor said. “If he was still there today, then we would formulate a plan to relocate him.”

But once the gator was disturbed and the man was bitten, the plan of action changed.

Dr. Norvell proceeded to capture the gator and released it back into the wild.

“The prudent thing to do with a gator before just jumping on it is to try and tire it out first,” said Officer Taylor. “This is what was done yesterday by the game biologist and he had no more problems with the gator.”

The gator was moved to a safe place, but the location was not revealed.

“That is for the safety of people and gator both,” the officer added.

  • Discuss

Welcome to the discussion.

6 comments:

  • kissmygrits posted at 10:51 am on Mon, May 21, 2012.

    kissmygrits Posts: 23

    Choot em Troy choot em

     
  • EJ The Carolina Queen posted at 12:18 pm on Fri, May 18, 2012.

    EJ The Carolina Queen Posts: 13

    Alligator catches man and releases him back to his people .

     
  • Drime posted at 5:56 pm on Thu, May 17, 2012.

    Drime Posts: 174

    I have seen gators in many areas of the county. They are not as rare as folks think. They were here long before we were and will probaly be here long after. Common sense tells me if wild creatures don't mess with us then leave them the @#$% alone.

    HERES YOUR SIGN!!!
    [wink][wink]

     
  • bigsur posted at 2:34 pm on Thu, May 17, 2012.

    bigsur Posts: 6

    Note to self:

    Do not date married women or mess around with a 10 foot gator![beam]

     
  • francis posted at 11:48 am on Thu, May 17, 2012.

    francis Posts: 2463

    Swamp People

     
  • francis posted at 5:16 am on Thu, May 17, 2012.

    francis Posts: 2463

    Now, that was a guy that knew it all.

     

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