Raking

Lifelong Cedar Island resident Sherman Goodwin, right, rakes mud and debris from his business Friday after flood waters choked the Down East village. (Dylan Ray photo)

Editor's note: This article was last updated Sept. 7 at 4:25 p.m.

 

MOREHEAD CITY — Carteret County officials began to assess damage from Hurricane Dorian Friday morning, but overall, it appears the area weathered the storm fairly well.

County Emergency Management Public Information Officer Amanda Tesch said Friday morning they were sending out damage assessment crews. Later Friday, County Emergency Management Public Information Officer Jamie Long said the assessment crews were still Down East, checking out Cedar Island and South River.

“Other than those locations, things look very good,” she said, “But South River and Cedar Island had significant flooding.”

County officials report no deaths or injuries in Carteret County related to Dorian, and late Friday, emergency management rescinded the county evacuation order.

On Saturday morning, Ms. Tesch said the county emergency operations center was still open and power restoration work Down East was ongoing, but no new damage reports had come in.

“From what they (assessment crews) can see, there’s not much damage,” she said, “just water inundation.”

The EOC sent out a damage report Saturday. According to the release, flooding was extensive Down East, and Highway 12 was closed for a time due to flooding and marsh debris.

“Most roads are open now in Cedar Island and South River,” the report reads.

Despite the damage in some areas, things are already getting back to normal. Public school students are set to return to class Monday, along with students at Carteret Community College.

County offices and the court system will reopen at 8 a.m. Monday, and the county’s waste disposal sites returned to normal operating hours at 7 a.m. Saturday.

While there were still power outages in areas around the county, including all of Bogue Banks, Friday afternoon, Ms. Long said Duke Energy Progress and Carteret-Craven Electrical Cooperative had personnel assessing their infrastructure.

“It wasn’t a total outage with all the substations,” Ms. Long said.

As of Saturday morning, the most extensive outages are Down East, and The Salvation Army has made arrangements to provide food in these areas.

The county cooperative extension office reported minimal damage to the county’s crops, noting most should be able to be harvested as long as the fields dry out in the next few days.

Morehead City resident Jim Boyd was out Friday morning after the hurricane passed taking pictures of some minor damage to a neighbor’s house. Mr. Boyd lives on Shepard Street with his wife, Jeanie, sons, Adam and Jacob, and mother-in-law, Mary McDonald.

“We did very well,” Mr. Boyd said, “I boarded everything up. There was a lot of wind about 4 a.m., rain blowing sideways.”

While Mr. Boyd and his family evacuated for Hurricane Florence last year, they rode this one out at home.

Amy and Chad Voorhees, who live on Evans Street, were out walking their dog Friday morning at Jaycee Park. They, too, said they fared well through Dorian.

“The transformer across the street from us blew,” Ms. Voorhees said. “But the only thing that happened to us is when I woke up, there was water dripping on my head.”

It turned out rain was being blown into the Voorhees’ attic through a vent, which Mr. Voorhees promptly boarded up.

“Florence was a lot worse,” he said. “It was much longer and there was more water.”

On the Morehead City waterfront along Evans Street, Lawrence Gavin was sitting outside Friday morning, relaxing.

“I had no problems at all (during the storm),” he said. “From talking with people I know, Dorian was nowhere near as bad as Florence.”

Morehead City resident Rhonda Sensenich rode out the storm with a friend on the 400 block of Arendell Street. They were outside cleaning up fallen tree limbs Friday morning.

“We had a front row seat,” Ms. Sensenich said. “I’ve been up and down the road and there’s not much damage. I went to check on my daughter on 20th Street. They still have power. They had a tree come down close to her trailer, but it didn’t do much damage.”

Gregory Tootle was riding his bike, enjoying the post-storm weather. He lives near Morehead Middle School. Mr. Tootle said he didn’t have much storm damage and his power didn’t go out until 3:30 a.m.

“This one wasn’t bad,” he said. “It was fine compared to Florence.”

Staff reporters Cheryl Burke and Jackie Starkey contributed to this report.

Contact Mike Shutak at 252-726-7081 ext. 206, email mike@thenewstimes.com; or follow on Twitter at @mikesccnt.

Previous report

MOREHEAD CITY — Carteret County officials are beginning to assess damage from Hurricane Dorian, but overall, it appears the county weathered the storm without any major disasters.

County Emergency Management Public Information Officer Amanda Tesh said Friday morning they were sending out damage assessment crews.

“I don’t believe we had any life-saving efforts (required),” she said, “just calls reporting power outages.”

Morehead City resident Jim Boyd was out Friday morning after the hurricane had passed, taking pictures of some minor damage to a neighbor's house. Mr. Boyd lives on Shepard Street with his wife, Jeanie, sons Adam and Jacob and mother-in-law Mary McDonald.

“We did very well,” Mr. Boyd said, “I boarded everything up. There was a lot of wind about 4 a.m., rain blowing sideways.”

While Mr. Boyd and his family evacuated for Hurricane Florence last year, they rode this one out at home.

Amy and Chad Voorhees, who live on Evans Street, were out walking their dog Friday morning at Jaycee Park. They too said they fared well through Dorian.

“The transformer across the street from us blew,” Ms. Voorhees said. “But the only thing that happened to us is when I woke up, there was water dripping on my head.”

It turned out the rain was being blown into the Voorhees’ attic through a vent, which Mr. Voorhees promptly boarded up.

“Florence was a lot worse (than Dorian),” Mr. Voorhees said. “It was much longer and there was more water.”

On the Morehead City waterfront along Evans Street, Lawrence Gavin was sitting outside Friday morning, relaxing and having a smoke.

“I had no problems at all (during the storm),” he said. “From talking with people I know, Dorian was nowhere near as bad as Florence.”

Morehead City resident Rhonda Sensenich rode out the storm with a friend on the 400 block of Arendell Street. They were outside cleaning up fallen tree limbs Friday morning.

“We had a front row seat,” Ms. Sensenich said. “I've been up and down the road and there's not much damage. I went to check on my daughter on 20th Street. They still have power. They had a tree come down close to her trailer, but it didn't do much damage.”

Gregory Tootle was out riding his bike Friday morning. He lives near Morehead Middle School. Mr. Tootle said he didn't have much storm damage, and his power didn't go out until 3:30 a.m.

“This one wasn't bad,” he said. “It was fine compared to Florence.”

 

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